News

University of Maryland School of Nursing Names Assistant Dean of PhD Program

April 16, 2014

Baltimore, Md. – The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) is pleased to announce that Mary E. (Meg) Johantgen, PhD, RN, associate professor and interim assistant dean for the PhD program, has accepted the position permanently.

As assistant dean, Johantgen is tasked with ensuring that graduates of the PhD program are well-prepared to meet the demands of future health research. She will be responsible for evaluating the curriculum, recruiting highly-competitive students nationally and internationally, and increasing the number of students who successfully compete for extramural funding.

“I am eager to lead UMSON’s PhD program during this exciting time as we work to increase our interdisciplinary collaborations in education and research,” Johantgen said. “There are also opportunities for increased synergy by facilitating collaboration between Doctor of Nursing Practice and PhD students.”

Prior to beginning her tenure at UMSON as an assistant professor in 1998, Johantgen served on the faculty at three other universities, where she taught health systems, research methods, and data management.  She also worked at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and in private industry, where she studied health care quality. As a co-investigator on numerous funded projects, Johantgen’s research interests have expanded to the implementation of evidence and the influence of regulation on patient outcomes.  She is also a member of the American Nurses Credentialing Center Research Council and has been a reviewer on numerous scientific review panels.

“We need a visionary leader who can take our PhD program to the next level,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN.  “I am confident that Dr. Johantgen will effectively lead our faculty, staff, and students in ensuring that the School reaches its goals. The program is in very capable hands.”  

# # #

The University of Maryland School of Nursing, founded in 1889, is one of the oldest and largest nursing schools, and is ranked eleventh nationally. Enrolling 1,700 students in its baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral programs, the School develops leaders who shape the profession of nursing and impact the health care environment.